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Living Data

Cabinet of Curiosities


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Living Data on the Move: Cabinet of Curiosities launched for Green Week, 2 June 2014
at the University of Technology, Sydney,level 3, building 4 (Science)

Scientists and artists collaborate to make ojects to inspire curiosity about the role of phytoplankton in the Ocean. Phytoplankton are microscopic living things including algae and diatoms that collectively produce half the oxygen we breathe. Scientists collect and analyse data to assess how they respond to rising temperatures and ocean acidifcation caused by our massive burning of fossil fuels.

Collaborators: Associate Professor Martina Doblin, PhD candidates Kirralee Baker and Charlotte Robinson, Professional Officer (Science) Susan Fenech, Creative Fellow Dr Lisa Roberts

Curator Anita Marosszeky

Anita Marosszeky arranges objects in the Cabinet of Curiosities.

 

Clockwise from top left:
Ocean water and sediment   Samples in glass flask with engraved iridescent-coated acrylic diatom form, mounted on metal tripod;
Dinoflagellate Bloom   UTS C3 Card by Martina Doblin;
Diatom musica   Necklace made with ear phones and engraved iridescent-coated acrylic diatom form, mounted on two square metal quadras;
iridescent phyto bling   Engraved iridescent-coated acrylic diatom forms (x2) on pale blue fluorescent acrylic sheet, mounted on square metal quadra;
Aquatic casting slide   Laser-cut clear acrylic sheet.

 

Clockwise from top left:
Secchi disk   Painted disk with rope;
Sea levels rising around Australia 1920-200   Data by John Church et al. engraved and tinted by Lisa Roberts into four clear acrlyic sheets, mounted with steel screws;
Seagrass leaf   UTS C3 Card by Stacey Trevathan-Tacket and Amy Keagy.

 

Clockwise from top left: Diatoms   UTS C3 Card by Martina Doblin;
Living algae   Algal culture in clear acrylic flask;
Ditylum rightwellii   Clear acrylic culture flasks engraved and tinted by Lisa Roberts in conversation with Kirralee Baker;
Algal forms dance   Three coloured fluorescent acrylic sheets (red, violet, green) engraved by Lisa Roberts and mounted in small heat sink.

 

Ditylum rightwellii Photo: Robyn Murphy

Scientist Kirralee Baker uses culture flasks to grow and test algae for their capacity to adapt to the changing Ocean. Sometimes mistakes happen with temperamental lab equipment and flasks melt with over heating. Kirralee recognises the shape of distorted flasks as similar in structure to the algae Ditylum rightwelliithat she studies for their responses to changing conditions.

 

Nature Works etchings by UTS scientist Andy Leigh are projected on screens beside the Cabinet of Curiosities.

 

Living Data on the Move: Cabinet of Curiosities set for launch during Green Week, 2 June 2014
at the University of Technology, Sydney,level 3, building 4 (Science).