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Living Data

Science Art & Talks


The experiential process of observation and reflection is key to art and science
and is an essential component in understanding interdependence
of all species and ecosystems, terrestrial and aquatic.
Paul Fletcher Animator

Science Art & Talks
Living Data Program for the 2013 Ultimo Science Festival, Sydney, September 12-21.

 

Undermine    Cook book by Carina Lee
The greatest human impact on environmental change is our use of fossil fuels.
Coal seam gas mining threatens our environment, food production and health.
Stories, art and recipes from Australia's Liverpool Plains give a taste of what we stand to lose.

Carina Lee
A Liverpool Plains story, art and recipe
from Undermine 2013

 

Carina Lee
Undermine Cook book
210mm x 179mm

 

Carina Lee
Above ground hydrological map
of the Liverpool Plains
Solar plate etching 260mm x 195mm
from Undermine 2013

 

A deeply felt, calmly informative, positive approach is brought to an increasingly tense subject.

I grew up on my family's cattle farm, situated within the Liverpool Plains of NSW, where the land is considered by many to be some of the best farming country in Australia, if not in the world. UNDERMINE has been inspired by generations of my homeland's successful food production. It is an activist recipe book that explores the proposed coal seam gas extractions for this food producing community, through the united voices of the Liverpool Plains farmers. UNDERMINE brings a deeply felt, calmly informative, positive approach to an increasingly tense subject.

To communicate the importance of this farming community and other rural areas across Australia that are threatened by coal seam gas mining, the book includes hand generated imagery combined with a time capsule of interviews with local people, their recipes, knowledge, and photos. UNDERMINE essentially brings the onus concerning the fight against coal seam gas back to the reader by asking them to value Australian grown food by ensuring its future security, community health, clean water. It distinctly alerts the reader to the current plans for coal seam gas extraction within one of Australia's largest food producing areas, the Liverpool Plains. It asks the reader: Will you sit back and watch the Australian government undermine it?

Carina Lee

 

Notes for exhibition designers:

The book (210mm x 179mm) and a pair of white gloves may be placed on a plinth so people can look through it.